Simulator Pilot


Aviation is changing! Are you up to the challenge? You will have to bring together your piloting skills, your IT skills and your team approach to enhance the role training is playing in supporting Airways.

Firstly, a bit about us – We’re Airways New Zealand.  We are one of the world's leading providers of commercial Air Navigation Services, responsible for air traffic within New Zealand's 30 million square kilometres of airspace.  These positions are within Airways wholly owned, commercial subsidiary Airways Training and play an important role in the delivery of engaging, robust training services. 

Joining our Air Traffic Control Simulation Team, you’ll work in a computer based environment using Radiotelephony (RTF) calls and keyboard commands to fly simulated aircraft in the training exercises for Air Traffic Controllers.  It is interesting and rewarding work for those comfortable in the Aviation Environment.

This is a full time (40 hours per week) position. The Simulator is available for training between 7am and 7pm seven days per week (but is mostly used Monday to Friday) and Simulator Pilots are required to have flexible availability and generally work shifts of eight hours duration. Paid training will be provided. Not interested in a full time commitment? We are also looking to replenish our casual pool.

Suitable applicants will be required to have:

  • Flying experience with an Instrument Flight Rating (IFR) or Air Traffic Service background desirable. 
  • Good keyboard skills
  • A Flight Radio Telephony Officer certificate
  • Good attention to detail, spatial orientation skills and can work well in a team
  • Be able to work any day of the week
  • Fluency in both written and spoken English

Only NZ residents will be considered for these roles. If successful, you will be required for training for two weeks starting soon.

Applications close at midnight 29th September 2019

Permanent Full Time, Permanent Part Time, Casual

Job no: 19.091

Location: Christchurch

Closing Date: Sunday, 29 September 2019

Print